News updates for Hobbes Fanclub

Joe Jack Talcum, Hobbes Fanclub, See Gulls at Soundscape Memoirs

Click through to listen to the podcast.

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Throwing Muses, Hobbes Fanclub, Joanna Gruesome, Lunchbox, Fishboy, Primitives at Tuning Into the Obscure

The Hobbes Fanclub – Up At Lagrange – Shelflife Records – LP/CD

Hazy and dreamy guitars and vocals gives this album a sort of hot, hazy and lazy summer feel, which for me is just perfect. It’s refreshing and relaxing at the same time, without compromising on songwriting or quality.  It definitely fits in with Shelflife’s vast catalog of sound, and this album delivers nothing short of perfect.  Fans of the Chills, The Ropes and even those who’ve been digging some of the more recent M83 singles will enjoy this album.  Sweet stuff! (4.8 out of 5)

Lunchbox – Lunchbox Loves You – Jigsaw Records – CD

Jangle, pop rock, indie, psyche, dream pop and a hint of garage make this album so delicious that I want a second helping. This album is quite sublime without losing any potency lyrically.  It’s hazy and dreamy at times but knows where to pack its punches.  It reminds me a bit of the September Girls with hints of the Vaselines, Veruca Salt and others.  The love here is mutual, Lunchbox! Keep on rocking!  (4.7 out of 5)

Fishboy – An Elephant – Yofishboy – LP + Graphic Novel

This indie punk lo-fi pop outfit returns with a soundtrack to their graphic novel that follows the ghost of Topsy the Elephant in her quest for vengeance for being electrocuted by Thomas Edison in 1903. And if you’ve seen that video footage from that time period, I think you’d find yourself joining Topsy’s quest.  This album rocks!  Life, death, and everything afterward makes this hard to resist, especially when it sounds so cheery.  It’s been a while I’ve come across a themed record like this where I dare to call it a rock opera of sorts.  Awesome!  (5 out of 5)

The Primatives – Spin-O-Rama – Elefant Records – CD

Their first album of new material in almost 22 years, the band creates some real indie-pop jewels. I’d say it likens closely to their early material from the mid 80s, picking up right where they left off.  It’s so catchy, sparkling and sweet without sacrificing its rock edge, like a more jangle-new wave Vaselines.  Male and female vocals make this extra dreamy. I can totally see why this band has been a major influence for so many bands/artists over the years.  The writing and composing are top notch and highly addictive. Lovely! (4.9 out of 5)

Joanna Gruesome / Trust Fund – Split 12” – HHBTM – 12”

Three tracks per band, starting off with Joanna Gruesome’s brand of jangle-pop-rock-folk that’s sure to please fans of just about any of the bands reviews above in this post. This is my first introduction to the band and I am hooked badly and need another fix. These three tracks are astonishingly engaging and staggeringly powerful.  Flip things over with Trust Fund and while the genre mixture stays somewhat similar, the flavor and the drive changes up a little bit.  It’s a great intro to the band for those who are not familiar with them and it is safe to say that if you liked Joanna Gruesome, you’re gonna love this!  Flawless split EP from start to finish.  (4.9 out of 5)

Throwing Muses – Purgatory / Paradise – HHBTM – LP

One of the most influential groups returns with a double LP (the CD came out in 2013 and the vinyl is brand spankin’ new!) and they pack a punch as you might expect. Everything about this album is powerful, beautiful and even haunting at times.  The magic is unmatchable.  Despite the absence of some of the founding members, nothing is lost here.  And the vocals are to die for. Seriously!  This is well worth having on either CD or vinyl – as long as you get a copy!  (5 out of 5)

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Hobbes Fanclub at El Planeta Amarillo

Tras dos cd-singles compartidos con otras bandas en Cloudberry y Dufflecoat y un 7” de adelanto ya en Shelflife, el trío de Bradford formado por Leon Carroll (voz y guitarra), Louise Phelan (bajo y coros) y Adam Theakston (batería) publica su esperadísimo álbum de debut, un fantástico trabajo en el que encontramos once maravillosas joyas de shoegaze e indiepop de guitarras muy en la onda de grupos de Sarah Records como SECRET SHINE, u otros como THE JESUS & MARY CHAIN, CLOSE LOBSTERS, TEENAGE FANCLUB, RIDE o THE ROPERS. Algunas de las canciones del álbum las han estado rodando en directo estos últimos meses, y ahora adquieren una relevancia deslumbrante. THE HOBBES FANCLUB saben encontrar el perfecto equilibro entre distorsión y melodía, creando estremecedoras armonías sobrepasadas de reverb que se abren paso entre colchones de guitarras llenas de fuzz, produciendo mágicas atmósferas llenas de color y nostalgia, canciones sobrantes de inspiración y talento que reúnen una gran multitud de influencias. El grupo ha vuelto a grabar algunas de las canciones que publicaron en sus primeros singles, como “The boy from outer space” o “Outside myself”. Estamos, en definitiva, ante un disco mayúsculo, un debut apasionante para un grupo que debería ocupar en el shoegaze actual el hueco que han dejado THE PAINS OF BEING PURE AT HEART.
Mis favoritas:

1. I knew you’d understand.
2. Your doubting heart.
3. The boy from outer space.

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Hobbes Fanclub at Baby Sue

The debut full-length release from the Bradford, England-based band The Hobbes Fanclub. These folks make music that recalls the 1990s when underground guitar bands seemed to be just about everywhere. Those days may (sadly) be gone…but they make us appreciate those ultra cool bands out there who aren’t afraid to turn up their guitars and have fun. This band is the trio comprised of Leon Carroll (vocals, guitar), Louise Phelan (bass, vocals), and Adam Theakston (drums). The songs on Up At Lagrange are presented simply, without incorporating many of the obstacles that litter most twenty-first century recordings. So what you get here…are tracks that pretty much sound like a real band playing real music. If you like distorted guitars, reverb, and nice reflective melodies you’ll find a lot to love here. We dig every single track, but our initial favorites include “Into The Night,” “The Boy From Outer Space,” and “Up At Lagrange.” We’ll be spinning this one for months to come. Recommended. Top pick.

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Hobbes Fanclub at Raised by Gypsies

Bands like The Hobbes Fanclub don’t come around often enough because as is demonstrated on “Up at Lagrange” to have this sound is not something particularly uncommon so much as that it how they execute the sound so perfectly which makes it that much more special.   In short, many bands will try and do what The Hobbes Fanclub has done here but most will fail as it is something seemingly only a select few can do this well.

Some obvious rock band comparisons come out right away:  The Get Up Kids, Gin Blossoms, Replacements, Lovedrug, the cleaner sound of Weezer and on the sixth song I even hear some resemblance to Modern English.   But what I hear most perhaps in here is that quality of Superdrag on their perhaps most recognized album, “Regretfully Yours”.

I only recently saw a collection of songs from John Davis (Superdrag frontman) on Bandcamp and downloaded them for free.   I thought that perhaps my initial reaction to this was based upon my having listened to Superdrag more recently, sort of an association that might not otherwise stick, but then during various parts on “Up at Lagrange” I found myself singing “Destination Ursa Major” or “I don’t even wonder if they’re gonna put me under”.

The fact is, it’s been a long time since Superdrag released “Regretfully Yours” and it had the impact on me that it has and so if this is going to be similar to that in a sense I’m fine with it.    Now this doesn’t have quite the same vocal qualities to it, which helps it to have its own identity for sure, but yeah, I’d say this just makes me as excited as I was when I first heard that Superdrag album and that’s pretty special right there.

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Hobbes Fanclub at Fear and Loathing in Long Beach

The spaces in between have a duplicity, they can surge momentum or deliver dream crushing confusion. When people talk about doing something new, changing their lives, or even their wardrobe, a sickening doubt always hangs in the air. Is it worth risking everything you’ve ever known and distrusted to give into the lustful motion of endless nights of pleasure and complete intoxication of all senses? Music has a way of guiding waves into the unknown through haunting melody, self-reflecting rhythms, and the masochistic strumming of road weary chords.

I used to think nostalgia was deadly. It can sting if you don’t bring the ghost into the present to see what captured your intellect and sex drive in the first place. Sometimes looking into the looking glass reveals the disappointing over exaggerations of our imagination or an opportunity to resume unfinished business. Stay in the sludge of complacency or drift and drift into the night with an insatiable appetite for unsolicited purity. The kind of pure that purrs with bite marks and bruises to remind you of how not invisible you really are.

Within the collection known as “Up at Lagrange” by Hobbes Fanclub, the reverberations of these feelings are breathing in distorted waves. Twisting and turning with seductive reverb and lucid solos that scream with Velvet Underground balladry, the empty spaces pop and spark with sugar coated heaviness that relies on nuance and power equally. This sequencing of airy vocals, sweet scattered guitars, and a pulsing bottom section grinds the shoegaze genre with a flirtatious bite of early 80s post-punk. A silver-tongued cocktail brimming with enough emotional turmoil and indifference to keep you awake all night but never promises you the memory of what you’re about to experience.

A dreamlike tornado of “Pleased to Meet Me” Replacements twists into a decadent pose with Galaxie 500 and the Jesus and Mary Chain. Tracks such as “Into the Night” and “Outside Myself” highlight what this band is capable of while providing an album that’s in perfect balance with itself. Standout tracks include the hypnotic “Stay Gold” and the feverish “Up at Lagrange”. This is definitely a band I will keep an eye on and one that keeps it hot coolness with each repeated listen.

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Hobbes Fanclub at 12XU

Das Shoegaze/Noisepop/C86-Revival der letzten Jahre ist ja mal ziemlich schnell ausgebrannt und den Weg aller kurzlebigen Indie-Hypes gegangen. Und ausgerechnet jetzt kommt da so eine Band aus Bradford dahergelaufen, die so tut als wäre diesbezüglich in den vergangenen fünf Jahren gar nix passiert. Somit weiß diese Platte dem Genre auch nicht viel neues hinzufügen, erinnert einen aber mal wieder daran wie viel Spaß dieser uralte Krempel immer noch machen kann, wenn die Songs und der Drive stimmen. War auch mal nötig in Zeiten, in denen die Köpfe mitverantwortlicher Protagonisten wie etwa The Pains Of Being Pure At Heart längst bis zum Hals in ihren eigenen Arschlöchern versunken scheinen.

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Hobbes Fanclub at God Is In The TV

The Bradford-based trio The Hobbes Fanclub conjure up a dreamy, reverb-dipped and melodic sound on their début album Up At Lagrange, which harks back to the restrained production values and style of late 80s/early 90s shoegaze pop. 

The delicate haze and plaintive vocals of‘Into The Night’ create a wonderful opening and is followed by the highlight‘Stay Gold’, which dazzles with its shimmering guitar hooks, early 90s production and colourful boy/girl vocal melodies. A version of the band’s 2012 début single ‘Your Doubting Heart’ provides a pacey breeze of sweetness, while the melancholic indie pop punk moment ‘The Boy From Outer Space’ delivers bright harmonies, yet the lyrics could have done with improvements. Although at first the splendid ‘I Knew You’d Understand’ just seems to blend in with the previous track, its joyous Stone Roses-esque melodies and emotive jangle catapult it to brilliance, before the wonderful ‘Run Into The Sea”s guitars ring out beautifully over a sweetly melodic and powerful, atmospheric backdrop, almost bringing to mind a Felt/Jesus And Mary Chain/Ride hybrid. Absolutely perfect for these late summer nights.

The magnificent shoegaze epic ‘How Could You Leave Me Like This’ is equally brilliant, contributing towards two fine centrepieces that pull at the heart strings while combining distortion and melody to brilliant effect. ‘Outside Myself’is energetic yet melancholic, and comes complete with a very Britpoppy guitar solo, but doesn’t feel as strong as the other tracks, while ‘Why Should You Tell The Truth’ is a dreamy grower, and with it’s swooning guitar lines, the title track sounds almost like what might have happened if Sonic Youth wrote ballads. The emotionally expansive, closer ‘Sometimes’ is beautifully spacious in its simplicity and effective in its largely instrumental structure, concluding the LP wonderfully.

On the very focused Up At Lagrange, sunset-lit shoegaze vibes and melodic alt-rock sounds are wired together to create a type of reverb-laden guitar pop that evokes the true indie of decades past, while picking up plenty of influences from more recent years. A delightful slow burning beauty of an album.

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Hobbes Fanclub, Luxembourg Signal, at The Primitives on Scared to Dance

Listen to the podcast at the link!

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Hobbes Fanclub at Paperblog

The Bradford-based trio The Hobbes Fanclub conjure up a dreamy, reverb-dipped and melodic sound on their debut album ‘Up At Lagrange’, which harks back to the restrained production values and style of late 80s/early 90s shoegaze pop. 

The delicate haze and plaintive vocals of ‘Into The Night’ create a wonderful opening and is followed by the highlight ‘Stay Gold’, which dazzles with its shimmering guitar hooks, early 90s production and colourful boy/girl vocal melodies. A version of the band’s 2012 debut single ‘Your Doubting Heart’ provides a pacey breeze of sweetness, while the melancholic indie pop punk moment ‘The Boy From Outer Space’ delivers bright harmonies, yet the lyrics could have done with improvements. Although at first the splendid ‘I Knew You’d Understand’ just seems to blend in with the previous track, its joyous Stone Roses-esque melodies and emotive jangle catapult it to brilliance, before the wonderful ‘Run Into The Sea”s guitars ring out beautifully over a sweetly melodic and powerful, atmospheric backdrop, almost bringing to mind aFelt/Jesus And Mary Chain/Ride hybrid. Absolutely perfect for these late summer nights.

The magnificent shoegaze epic ‘How Could You Leave Me Like This’ is equally brilliant, contributing towards two fine centrepieces that pull at the heart strings while combining distortion and melody to brilliant effect. ‘Outside Myself’ is energetic yet melancholic, and comes complete with a very Britpoppy guitar solo, but doesn’t feel as strong as the other tracks, while ‘Why Should You Tell The Truth’ is a dreamy grower, and with it’s swooning guitar lines, the title track sounds almost like what might have happened if Sonic Youthwrote ballads. The emotionally expansive, closer ‘Sometimes’ is beautifully spacious in its simplicity and effective in its largely instrumental structure, concluding the LP wonderfully.

On the very focused ‘Up At Lagrage’, sunset-lit shoegaze vibes and melodic alt-rock sounds are wired together to create a type of reverb-laden guitar pop that evokes the true indie of decades past, while picking up plenty of influences from more recent years. A delightful slow burning beauty of an album. 7.8/10

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