Posts Tagged ‘dublab’

Crayon at Dublab

Sometime around 1992/93, after the rise of alternative rock and before the death of Kurt Cobain, there was a sweet spot in the pop-culture landscape for DIY punk, noise rock and the many permutations of lo-fi pop. There was Shimmy Disc, the documentary “The Year Punk Broke”, and the movie slackers. Zines and indie labels celebrated and embraced all that. Crayonwalked that fine line of the not quite aggressive, yet hard enough to not be pure pop. Lo fi to its purest, the re-issue of “Brick Factory” by HHBTM Records is on limited edition vinyl (the album was originally only released on CD and cassette). In addition, the digital download includes 21 bonus songs comprising tracks from 7 inch singles, compilations, 4-track demos and never before heard unreleased songs.

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Crayon at Dublab

Sometime around 1992/93, after the rise of alternative rock and before the death of Kurt Cobain, there was a sweet spot in the pop-culture landscape for DIY punk, noise rock and the many permutations of lo-fi pop. There was Shimmy Disc, the documentary “The Year Punk Broke”, and the movie slackers. Zines and indie labels celebrated and embraced all that. Crayonwalked that fine line of the not quite aggressive, yet hard enough to not be pure pop. Lo fi to its purest, the re-issue of “Brick Factory” by HHBTM Records is on limited edition vinyl (the album was originally only released on CD and cassette). In addition, the digital download includes 21 bonus songs comprising tracks from 7 inch singles, compilations, 4-track demos and never before heard unreleased songs.

[Link]

Primitives at Dublab

Although the original line-up that The Primitives started with in Coventry (England) included PJ Court, Keiron McDermott, Steve Dullaghan and Pete Tweedie, before releasing their first and successful album, “Lovely”, in 1988, Tweedie had already been substituted by Tig Williams, and Mcdermott was replaced by the platinum blonde Tracy Tracy, the band’s true icon. Coming out of the independent scene that bands like The Jesus & Mary Chain, The Wedding Present, My Bloody Valentine and Primal Scream came out of, this line-up found the perfect balance between the crystalline guitars of The Byrds, the agility and speed of the Ramones and the unforgettable melodies of Orange Juice. Their return after a long hiatus is nothing short of classic. Their new songs are fresh, powerful and reminiscent of the band we used to and still love.

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Joe Jack Talcum at dublab

For most people the idea of an intimate evening with Joe Jack Talcum playing songs in their living room sounds terrifying given the reputation of his better-known band The Dead Milkmen, but this collection of home recordings show a more intimate side to a songwriter better known for his sense of humor. “Talk” and the rest of the songs from the “Home Recordings vol 2 1993-1999” are delicate and subtle. “No one’s looking for this. It’s too subtle, too heartfelt, too understated. But everyone who hears it is going to fall in love, and isn’t that enough—after all there are better ways to measure success than stardom.”

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