Posts Tagged ‘hulaboy’

Emotional Response at Blurt

Click through for reviews of Hulaboy, Safe Distance, and Boyracer!

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Hulaboy at Big Takeover

With twenty years of collaborating under their belts, Boyracer’s Stewart Andersonand Eric Stoess of Louisville, KY legends,Hula Hoop, get together again for another small slab of vinyl.

He’s Making Violent Love to Me, Mother is the ’60s aficionado’s wet dream. “Exes and Enemies” kicks things off with a contemplative, Kinks-y look at social media and the way it drags us into the past, while “Napalm Heart delivers some punchy mod power pop fit for the Jamcontingent. “Kids Under Stars,” on the other hand, explodes with the fury of The MC5coupled with The Open Mind’s penchant for Hendrix worship. It’s as solid a release as any, and one that’s sure to grace the turntable over and over again, whether anybody wants to hear it or not.

Sometimes, band members step out of their comfort zones into halls of shame, but, when the chemistry is right, such meanderings can be magic. Hulaboy is one such charmed digression that deserves to be recognized as more than a side-project. May future endeavors be as mind-expanding.

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Emotional Response at Big Takeover

Click through for playlist.

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Hulaboy, Boyracer, and Safe Distance at Scared to Dance

Stream the podcast at the link!

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Emotional Response at The Ringmaster Review

For a change we are clubbing together a trio of releases to look at in one go, the reason for this being the common denominator of musician/songwriter Stewart Anderson. The 7” releases from Boyracer,Hulaboy, and The Safe Distance are three early propositions of new indie label Emotional Response formed by Anderson and wife Jen Turrell. Having also run 555 Records and Red Square over the past couple of decades, the pair set up their new project with the intent of recording and releasing new music with friends, the outcomes limited in availability, produced on coloured vinyl, and only available right now through their website http://jenandstew.com/.

With their first release coming in 1991, Boyracer has been a constant source of excited punk pop, releasing over 800 songs since that first exploit with records unleashed through labels such as
Sarah, Slumberland, Blackbean, and Placenta. Coming off a four year hiatus, the Anderson founded proposition offers the Pete Shelley EP as their final release, with Turrell and Sarah Records era guitarist Matt Greenjoining Anderson for four irrepressible pop escapades. The EP opens with its title track, a bass and guitar drama with jabbing beats and expressive vocals. The song is lightly stomping from the off, beats punchy in a weave of politely jangling guitars and potently alluring hooks. It is not much more than a breath over a minute in length but provides pure contagious revelry for feet and imagination to greedily devour.

The following 3nd Wave Mod is similarly parading a fleet of inescapable hooks and quaint melodies within this time a rawer frame of rhythms and chords. As infectious as the first and with a great concussive crescendo in its middle, the song provides a tasty alternative pop adventure which the following The Kind Of Man You Really Are emulates with its tangy melodic clang and the brilliantJump surpasses with its twee pop devilry. Led vocally by Turrell this time, the fourth song swiftly reminds of seventies UK bands like The Chefs and Girls At Our Best. Bouncing with a mischievous melodic grin enhanced by the summery caress of keys, and a rhythmic incitement which again has feet instantly engaged, the song is an anthem for the passions. The release comes with two bonus tracks which were not on our promo but it is hard to imagine them being any less thrilling than the four songs already treating ears.

The Hulaboy EP, He’s making violent love to me, mother, is the celebration of a twenty year friendship between Anderson and Eric M. Stoess, a three track vinyl offering which plays ears with melodic charm and citrus sonic flavouring. As shown by first track Exes and Enemies, there is a sharp tone to the melodies which caress the senses but comes wrapped in a mellow and engaging elegance which is almost whimsical in its breath and temptation. Rhythms are firm though, giving the endeavour depth and muscle in all the right places and through the quirkily enterprising croon of the song.

Napalm Heart flares with lo-fi tenacity and melodic flaming from the first second, its undiluted catchiness and crispy resonance like a blend of The Freshies with a more cheerful Josef K, which for a minute and a half has ears inflamed and emotions wrapped up in sonic devilment. The flirtatious track is followed by Kids Under Stars, a raw blaze of sonic rapacity and garage rock causticity soaked in sixties pop colouring. The blistering encounter completes the impressive vinyl version of the single whilst the download comes with an additional seven tracks, with I find your topsiders and beard amusing and a great cover of Echo and the Bunnymen’s The Cutter particular standout moments.

Final release, the Songs EP from The Safe Distance, is the global link up of American Anderson on bass and organ with vocalist/guitarist Crayola Sarandon (Sarandon / A Witness) from the UK and Australian drummer David Nichols (Cannanes / Huon). Casting quirky dark pop clad in gripping shadows and brought with rippling sinews, the band uncage four tracks for the vinyl release of their EP.Hey you sets things off, probing beats aligned to guitar jangles and great monotone delivered vocals the initial delicious bait. The song proceeds to roam with a predatory glint in its sonic eye and bracing flames to its melodic hue, the imposition tempered by the flowery charm of keys and the addictive lure of the vocals. The song is
pure drama and quite infectious, a description also suiting the more restlessly contagious Soap. Tastily scuzzy but retaining a warm glow to its raw sound and invention, the track swiftly has thoughts and appetite gripped, whilst A bigger splash with its sultry smouldering of melodies and keys takes a little longer to draw a healthy dose of satisfaction but has ears and imagination fully involved by the time of its final fuzzy note.

The punkish Sandpit concludes the quartet of tracks, its bluesy roar and caustic energy colluding for a thoroughly thrilling slice of dirty rock ‘n’ roll, keys and guitars especially kicking up a dust storm with their sonic voracity. Completing the vinyl version, it is just part of another four original tracks on the download as well as a trio of covers featuring Hawkwind’s Silver Machine, Adam and the Ants’ Young Parisians, and the excellent take of Bogshed’s Fat lad exam failure.

Perfectly diverse but united in the songwriting prowess of Anderson and others involved, all the singles make an impressive entrance into the independent and underground scene by Emotional Response Records.

The releases from Boyracer, Hulaboy, and The Safe Distance are all available on coloured 7” vinyl and digitally now via Emotional Response Records @ http://jenandstew.com/

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Emotional Response at Too Much Rock

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Emotional Response at Whisperin and Hollerin

This is one of 3 singles all now out on Flagstaff Arizona’s Emotional Response label. They all come with bonus material on the download cards and are on coloured vinyl; this time out it’s marbled purple which is very cool indeed.

Hulaboy are Eric from Hula Hoop and Stuart Anderson from Boyracer who have apparently been putting out stuff together now for 20 years. From the opening line of “That’s What Facebooks for”, Exes and Enemies is a dry look at what you find out about your exes by trawling Facebook all over some ripe C86-style indie reminiscent of The Popguns and with some great keyboards.

Now if you only download it and don’t play the 7″ single the next song is The Kid Asked: a heart-breaking story about a kid witnessing some domestic violence. It’s moving and a slow rumination on the damage done to the witnesses let alone the victims of violence. Back to the vinyl where Exes and Enemies is followed by the excellent Napalm Heart: a bittersweet song about a woman with a heart of Napalm that sounds quite sweet despite the vicious lyrics.

On the b-side is Kids Under Stars; a cool Psych-indie tune that reminds me of Spitfire or early Hang Ten-era Soup Dragons with a garage-rock edge and cool lyrics and then towards the end it goes properly wonky with a bass riff that could have been stolen from Joy Division. But on the download that’s much later on.

Anyway, taking the bonus tracks (all 7 of them) I Find Your Topsiders and Beard Amusing is odd and compelling and rather out there wonky indie with a sly grin on its face. Hey opens with the EP’s title track He’s Making Violent Love To Me, Mother as the clattering begins and it could almost be the raggedy end of the Drop Nineteens or Velvet Crush over some deep lyrics about the love that has gone and why he don’t want her back.

I’m Not From Louisville I’m From LaGrange Motherfucker is a clattering, shambling rant rock after someone obviously said he looked like the slugger or some other local insult that set him off on one. And this song IS off on one!!

The Western Mark E Smith makes an attempt to put a western tinge on him as opposed to The Jazz Butcher’s Southern Mark Smith. He certainly deserves the treatment as this sounds like The Fall gone awry and trying to behave like they are sober. As if!! It’s also a song about betrayal and love gone wrong in odd ways.

Not Another Orange Juice Song is actually a cover of Echo and the Bunnymen’s The Cutter and they do a good clattering job as it’s just off enough to kind of nail it and not have the preening cock of the walk insouciance that Mac the Mouth is famous for.

The download bit finishes with the brief and cool We Saw Crispin Glover: as much a fade out as anything but a cool end to a very interesting single and download that can be found at Emotional Response Bandcamp page.

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Emotional Response at The Sunday Experience

First of three new 7’s from the emotional response imprint a label headed up by Jen Turrell and Stewart Anderson of 555 recordings and red square fame – the latter of whom happens to feature on all three releases as boyracer mainstay). So far Hulaboy have thus far managed to escape our ever watchful eye, a forging of alliances between Eric Hula Hoop and Stewart Boyracer marking a friendship going back some twenty years. Now we were expecting all manner of edgy and schizoid hijinks – at least that’s what the press release was hinting at, instead ‘exes and enemies’ is an impishly tasty slice of acutely cool bracing beat pop that literally beams and radiates with the kind of sweetly cured power pop purr that littered frequently the grooves of classic twee platters shimmying out of the Sarah, bus stop and summershine sound houses of years long past. More punch you out hook heavy ear snaring melodies adorn the grooves of ‘nepalm heart’ a kind of punked popped Teen Anthems blessed with a turn of musical phrase so catchy that jabs ought to accompany it. Best of the trio by some distance ‘kids under stars’ is a bit of curio that manages to freewheel in all manner of 60’s psych beat pop haziness whilst equally fuzzing out to a mind wiping and stoned heavy blues freaksome key swirled white out.

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Hulaboy at Losing Today

First of three new 7’s from the emotional response imprint a label headed up by Jen Turrell and Stewart Anderson of 555 recordings and red square fame – the latter of whom happens to feature on all three releases as boyracer mainstay). So far Hulaboy have thus far managed to escape our ever watchful eye, a forging of alliances between Eric Hula Hoop and Stewart Boyracer marking a friendship going back some twenty years. Now we were expecting all manner of edgy and schizoid hijinks – at least that’s what the press release was hinting at, instead ‘exes and enemies’ is an impishly tasty slice of acutely cool bracing beat pop that literally beams and radiates with the kind of sweetly cured power pop purr that littered frequently the grooves of classic twee platters shimmying out of the Sarah, bus stop and summershine sound houses of years long past. More punch you out hook heavy ear snaring melodies adorn the grooves of ‘nepalm heart’ a kind of punked popped Teen Anthems blessed with a turn of musical phrase so catchy that jabs ought to accompany it. Best of the trio by some distance ‘kids under stars’ is a bit of curio that manages to freewheel in all manner of 60’s psych beat pop haziness whilst equally fuzzing out to a mind wiping and stoned heavy blues freaksome key swirled white out.

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