Posts Tagged ‘wondering sound’

Eureka California at Wondering Sound

In the video for “Happy Again,” the two members of Athens band Eureka California — Jake Ward and Marie A. Uhler — inspect ham at a supermarket, walk Stand by Me-style down a set of train tracks, climb up a jungle gym and make shadow puppets against a tin wall. It’s light and carefree stuff, and it’s a perfect contrast to the song that’s raging behind them as they do it. A big, gnarled, guitar-driven number, “Happy Again” has the frantic quality of early indie rock, its edges jagged, its melody bug-eyed and hollered. The band’s pop instincts are undeniable, but on “Happy Again” they keep things loose and appropriately reckless, big, bleary and fun.

Eureka California’s latest record is available on the great label Happy Happy Birthday to Me.

[Link]

Pinkshinyultrablast at Wondering Sound

The Russian group Pinkshinyultrablast are already garnering raves from the likes of the Guardian, the NME and BBC Radio, and all it takes is a few seconds of the radiant “Land’s End” to see why. The song is both beautiful and mysterious: filmy guitars form a mirage-like backdrop for Lyubov’s (one name only, thank you) drifting, ethereal vocals. It would be easy to name-check the Cocteau Twins, but there’s more drive and ballast to “Land’s End” than that group’s drifting lullabies. By the time the guitar woosh out full force at the halfway mark, it feels more like a wind turbine than a gentle spring breeze. “Land’s End” is a kaleidoscope of sound, ever-changing, always entrancing.

 

[Link]

Mind Brains at Wondering Sound

Call Mind Brains a supergroup if you like — the Athens band features members of Olivia
Tremor Control, Marshmallow Coast, of Montreal, the Music Tapes and more —l but you’ll find no bombast or grandstanding on their deliriously delightful self-titled LP. Sound instead arrives in hallucinogenic waves: vocal harmonies bend and wobble, distorted synths blast and lurch and the drumming sounds like it’s lifted from some strange drunken dream sequence in an animated Dali nightmare. It’s Queen on Quaaludes, a distant mirage of the Fab Four at their most acid-eaten and freaked-out. Mind Brains is a blissed-out feast for the senses, bursting with unending joy.

Mind Brains will be released on Orange Twin Records on January 20.

Click through for the album stream.

[Link]

Throwing Muses at Wondering Sound

Throwing Muses‘ first new album in 10 years, 2013′s Purgatory/Paradise, is finally coming to vinyl — and cassette. Last fall, the Kristin Hersh-led band released the album as part of a multimedia set, packaging the 32-track CD within a 64-page book of lyrics, commentary, photos and art; Purgatory/Paradise was also available as an e-book-and-music app. Now, HHBTM Records has announced it will issue vinyl and tape editions of the album on October 28.

The vinyl release comes as a double-LP, with what a press release describes as a “super thick gatefold dual pocket Tip-On sleeve” and a fold-out, full-color, double-sided insert that’s 11 inches by 22 inches. There’s also a download card. The vinyl and cassette version each can be pre-ordered in deluxe packages with a Throwing Muses tote bag and set of three full-color buttons.

Hersh published a memoir, Rat Girl, in 2010. “My life used to be dressing rooms, hotel rooms, tour buses,” she told Douglas Wolk last year, in an interview for Wondering Sound sister site eMusic. “Now I speak directly with my listeners — and I would like to hide, I really enjoyed hiding — but I have to admit I’m a bit humbled by their brilliance.”

Pre-orders, which start shipping in mid-October, are available for vinyl here and cassette here.

[Link]

Joe Jack Talcum at Wondering Sound

Batch of songs from Dead Milkman frontman matches his inimitable tiny-voice to sparse acoustic instrumentation. This is lo-fi folk, tender and fragile. Fans of early Sentridoh should love this.

[Link]

Eureka California at Wondering Sound

There’s knowing your audience and then there’s knowing your audience, and the Athens, GA band Eureka, California definitely know their audience. Why else would they package the deluxe edition of their new albumCrunch with a mock 33 1/3-style book about the record’s creation, if not to appeal to the very sorts of people who would freak out over such a thing, this writer included. Sure enough, one listen to Crunch‘s excellent “Twin Cities” bears that out. A fantastically clanging number, the song recalls music nerd indie rock of old, with hollered vocals and the kind of fuzzy, slashing chords that used to show up on released by Homestead Records. The band sacrifices neither melody nor scuzz, recreating guitar-driven slacker rock in their own image.

https://soundcloud.com/hhbtm-records/eureka-ca-twin-cities

[Link]