Posts Tagged ‘pop stereo’

Moon Types at POP! Stereo

The Moon Types single Know The Reason is a perfect slice of indie pop neatly served on a 7” platter. Beaming with west coast vibes, radiant horns, and mellow melodies this little record is a bit of heaven via Sweden. The siblings Klein (Jesper and Josefin) know their way around a pop song and manipulate all the tricks to create rays of jangly, jolly jubilance that’s as firmly rooted in 60’s pop as it is modern indie.

 

Know The Reason is a near perfect record that’s unfortunately short at twelve minutes long. For those twelve minutes, however, indie pop bliss is all ours and it’s lit by the glow of the moon (types). It’s been a while since Swedish indie pop was all the rage, but The Moon Types haven’t forgotten and they clearly Know The Reason why it was to begin with.

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Lunchbox at POP! Stereo

I’m not 100% sure Lunchbox’s single Smash Hits does indeed contain any actual smash hits but what it does contain is a shambolic romp through the indie rock and pop canon. Frenetic, noisy, and a bit chaotic Smash Hits is an energetic and noisy amalgamation of sloppy guitars, geeky vocals, and hooks the size of Texas. The whole things sounds like it might just spin off the 7” and break apart but Lunchbox manage to hold it all together for the six songs that make up this record.

 

Smash Hits is messy fun. It’s jumpy, hyper and is obviously fueled by a bit of pop ADHD. It’s all over the place musically but the melodies are as strong as steel and they rope your ears in. Lunchbox may bash their way through this record but I bet you remember at least one riff or chorus for days. Smash Hits is good stuff and it’s proof positive that good things do come in small packages.

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Static Daydream at POP! Stereo

Where Snow In Mexico fully embrace a stark minimalistic approach to writing music (see below), Static Daydream on the other hand tackle pop music with sheets and walls of distorted bliss enveloping the listener. Their latest self-titled album is an effects, pedal loving affair that brings the best elements of Chapterhouse and My Bloody Valentine and smash them together in a super-collider of distortion and post shoegazing euphoria. Static Daydream is a brilliant slab of post-shoegazing that sounds like it was produced in 1992 and left on a shelf at Creation’s office once Oasis came along.
Entrenched in everything that made the early gazing scene so great, Static Daydream have studied and mastered the manual and have taken those skills and created eleven songs as proof of their mastery. With cascading sheets of noise, drum machine beats, distortion overpowering everything and of course a detached vocal track Static Daydream is awash with enough noise, beats, and heavenly like hooks to just about reach instant classic status. This is clearly a record for anyone who admires dry ice clouds , guitar pedals and the early 4ad/Creation catalog.

With equal parts of aggression and placidity the record is a roller coaster ride of what you can do with a guitar and some nifty production. It’s a perfect record for the most part and for anyone that’s ever loved the Scene that Celebrated Itself they’ll rejoice in it’s rapturous washes, moody ethereality, and otherworldly charm. Static Daydream is a psychedelic record for the angelic set and it truly sounds as if it’s from another world. Distortion and noise shouldn’t sound this good but Static Daydream proves it’s possible that there’s beauty in losing your hearing and Static Daydream is proof positive.

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Eureka California / Black Watch / Primitives at The POP! Stereo

18) The Black Watch – Sugarplum Fairy, Sugarplum Fairy
These guys have been kicking around forever.  They’ve never really gotten the respect they deserve but over the course of their career have been fairly consistent when it comes to producing very good pseudo-noise pop with an 80’s British pop feel. Sugarplum Fairy, Sugarplum Fairy is no different and only serves to build upon their mythos. As if to prove the point that they don’t get the respect they deserve they don’t have one single video on YouTube!


14) Eureka California – Crunch
Happy Happy Birthday To Me never let you down.  They’ve released so many seminal indie pop and indie rock records it’s hard to keep track of.  Crunch is yet another one in their catalog.  Crunch is classic indie rock in that Merge records kind of way.  It’s noisy, shambolic and seemingly held together by duct tape but the band create melodies out of all that and make it a fun, white knuckle ride through a set of guitar strings and broken pedals.  Not sure if they’re named after the earthquake that happened years ago (Google it) but it would kind of make sense if they were…


2) The Primitives – Spin O Rama
This was perhaps the biggest surprise of 2014.  Having been a fan of this band since 1992 (and collecting every single and album in every format imaginable) it gave me goosebumps when I actually got hold of Spin O Rama.   What’s truly amazing about this album is that they’ve somehow managed to sound exactly the way they did from 86 – 92.  Tracy Tracy sounds adorable as ever and the band sound as if they haven’t left the flowers they wen’t through in the mid-80’s.  Spin O Rama is a masterwork of fizzy indie pop that serves as a reminder that you can teach old dogs new tricks.

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Eureka California at POP! Stereo

Sometimes being obnoxious can work to your advantage. It certainly does for Eureka California who’s album Crunch is an energetic explosion of spazztic indie rock riffage and their second album in less than two years. Seemingly unable to stop making music, Eureka California can’t slow down and that inability to control themselves is reflected within the sounds of Crunch. Sounding like a long lost artifact unearthed from 1994, this record is loud, raw, unrefined and about as sloppy as the best Pavement record. 

Crunch is a hyper, jumpy, caffeine fueled journey through eleven songs in twenty five minutes. It’s such a fantastic mess that the whole thing sounds like it was pieced together with chewing gum and duct tape and recorded on a broken boom box found their parents garage. It’s exuberant and simple and almost impossible not to love. Guitars jangle, wrangle, distort and sound like they’re tearing themselves apart while drums bash and bang and the vocals strain, scream, and snap vocal chords. Crunch is one giant wall of indie rock noise that should really suck but miraculously doesn’t. It’s proper indie rawk and it’s relentless in the pursuit of the two minute noisy pop song. 

Crunch on paper isn’t much to write home about, it’s an uncomplicated, noisy and brash mess. But listening to the thing makes it all worthwhile. This is what indie rock is supposed to be like; it’s honest, raw, and pure and contains zero percent posturing. As their bio notes Eureka California are often torn between rocking out and giving up. How can you not love that? That’s the kind of rock and roll I want to listen to…bands with a suicidal lust to just kick butt and rock out or chuck in the towel and go home.

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Luxembourg Signal at POP! Stereo

The Luxembourg Special while being a new band on paper really aren’t and features members that have been playing for years if not decades under other guises. From Aberdeen to Fonda to Trembling Blue Stars and who knows what in between the members of Luxembourg Special have spent some time in the indie pop trenches and learned a thing or two about writing a great pop song. As if to prove that point that’s where Luxembourg Special’s debut single comes into play. 

Distant Drive is a gorgeous two song slice of indie pop pie that tastes like a bit of Siouxsie and the Banshees, “Hong Kong Garden,” blissed out on Robin Guthrie and then mixed with The Heartthrobs early output. Confused? Don’t be, the single is dreamy, lush, and ethereal. Guitars swirl, synths wash over you and vocals sigh gently into your ears all the while implanting hooks into your brain that hypnotize you into pop submission. The whole thing is warm and fuzzy and ridiculously good and with Luxembourg Special’s pedigree how could it not be? This is dream pop re-born and while I love all the bands that the Luxembourg Special have been in, something just grabs me about them this time around that gives me goosebumps. These guys are great and for a debut single, they’ve just about knocked it out of the ballpark.

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Eureka California at POP! Stereo

Sometimes being obnoxious can work to your advantage. It certainly does for Eureka California who’s album Crunch is an energetic explosion of spazztic indie rock riffage and their second album in less than two years. Seemingly unable to stop making music, Eureka California can’t slow down and that inability to control themselves is reflected within the sounds of Crunch. Sounding like a long lost artifact unearthed from 1994, this record is loud, raw, unrefined and about as sloppy as the best Pavement record. 

Crunch is a hyper, jumpy, caffeine fueled journey through eleven songs in twenty five minutes. It’s such a fantastic mess that the whole thing sounds like it was pieced together with chewing gum and duct tape and recorded on a broken boom box found their parents garage. It’s exuberant and simple and almost impossible not to love. Guitars jangle, wrangle, distort and sound like they’re tearing themselves apart while drums bash and bang and the vocals strain, scream, and snap vocal chords. Crunch is one giant wall of indie rock noise that should really suck but miraculously doesn’t. It’s proper indie rawk and it’s relentless in the pursuit of the two minute noisy pop song. 

Crunch on paper isn’t much to write home about, it’s an uncomplicated, noisy and brash mess. But listening to the thing makes it all worthwhile. This is what indie rock is supposed to be like; it’s honest, raw, and pure and contains zero percent posturing. As their bio notes Eureka California are often torn between rocking out and giving up. How can you not love that? That’s the kind of rock and roll I want to listen to…bands with a suicidal lust to just kick butt and rock out or chuck in the towel and go home.

[Link]